Children and Adults with ADHD (CHADD)
Becoming an Adult and Managing ADHD

Becoming an Adult and Managing ADHD

October 28, 2021

Are you a parent of a teen or a teenager who’s transitioning into adulthood? Well, this episode of the All Things ADHD podcast is for you. We gave our mic over to guest host Liam Tolbert, a teenager who is managing ADHD and learning to be independent. Many teens with ADHD may find emerging into adulthood stressful, frustrating, and challenging since most of their life has been supervised by a parent, teacher, or caregiver. Tolbert speaks with Dr. Eugene Arnold, CHADD’s resident expert, about ADHD healthcare responsibilities young adults need to know, understanding and managing symptoms to help individuals succeed, and overcoming barriers to accessing good healthcare.

 

Creencias culturales y el manejo del TDAH en familias latinas

Creencias culturales y el manejo del TDAH en familias latinas

October 14, 2021
Descripción:
Los padres latinos muchas veces están navegando por aguas difíciles cuando se trata de proporcionar apoyo a sus hijos que tienen TDAH. Muchos padres tienen conexiones fuertes con su cultura y relaciones con amigos y familiares que no están familiarizados con el diagnóstico de TDAH. Las escuelas muchas veces luchan con su diferenciación entre lo que es el TDAH y un problema cultural, disciplinario, familiar o problemas de hablar y el lenguaje. Aumentar la comprensión y el empoderamiento de los padres es un primer paso fundamental para ayudar a los jóvenes latinos con TDAH a prosperar en el hogar y la escuela.

Objetivos:
1. Identificar las suposiciones y entendimientos comunes que tienen los padres latinos sobre el TDAH.
2. Describir las formas en que las escuelas malinterpretan los síntomas del TDAH en los jóvenes latinos.
3. Nombrar formas clave en las que los padres y las escuelas pueden trabajar juntos para promover la comprensión, la empatía y la colaboración.

 

 

Women in Midlife and ADHD

Women in Midlife and ADHD

October 5, 2021

Many women struggle at midlife with undiagnosed and untreated ADHD complicated by hormonal changes. They typically report feeling overwhelmed, inadequate, misunderstood, and distressed at a time in their lives when they often have the greatest demands on their time and energy. Women not diagnosed with ADHD until adulthood are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, anxiety, sleep disorders, eating disorders, substance use, and low self-esteem.

 

In this episode, Dr. Carol Robbins provides an understanding of the challenges women face in midlife with ADHD, coping strategies, and the importance of reaching out when help is needed.

 

Read more about women in midlife and ADHD.

 

Carol Ann Robbins, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD across the lifespan. She is the clinical director of the Annapolis ADHD Center and works with Kathleen Nadeau, PhD, an internationally known expert on ADHD, at the Chesapeake ADHD Center of Maryland. Dr. Robbins is a seasoned speaker, presenter, and author, as well as past president of the Maryland Psychological Association and coordinator of the MPA Post-Doctoral Institute on ADHD Across the Lifespan. She has served as coordinator of the Anne Arundel County chapter of CHADD since 2002.

 

ADHD and the Struggle with Suicidal Ideation

ADHD and the Struggle with Suicidal Ideation

September 17, 2021

ADHD impairments are made worse for many individuals by their struggles with excessive anxiety, persistent depression, compulsive behaviors, difficulties with mood regulation, or other coexisting disorders that persistently disrupt their daily lives. Sometimes this could lead a person struggling with their ADHD down a dark road to contemplating suicide.

Talking about suicide, suicidal ideation, and self-harm with a loved one you suspect has these feelings can be challenging. Dr. Roberto Olivardia talks with Susan Buningh about the risk factors in children and adults who have ADHD, warning signs, and preventive measures to help someone you think may be considering self-harm or suicide.

 

Dr. Roberto Olivardia is a clinical psychologist and lecturer in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He maintains a private psychotherapy practice in Lexington, Massachusetts, where he specializes in the treatment of ADHD, executive functioning issues, and students with learning differences. He also specializes in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and eating disorders in boys and men. He currently serves on the professional advisory boards for CHADD, ADDA, and the National Association for Males with Eating Disorders.

Latino Culture and ADHD Treatment

Latino Culture and ADHD Treatment

September 14, 2021

ADHD is found in all communities. For Latinos, cultural norms and barriers to healthcare affect the perception of ADHD symptoms in children, which may go unnoticed or undiagnosed. What are some of the cultural barriers to ADHD treatment? How can cultural beliefs affect treatment for ADHD? Dr. Lauren Haack will discuss common symptoms of ADHD and its presence in the Latino population. In addition, she gives insight into important cultural considerations professionals need to be aware of when treating Latinos with ADHD. She will also discuss how gender roles and family values may influence decisions about treatment options.

 

Lauren Haack, PhD, is an assistant professor and attending psychologist in the department of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Her research program and clinical practice focus on accessible and culturally attuned evidence-based services for vulnerable youth and families, with a particular specialty in ADHD services for children in Spanish-speaking, Latinx families.

 

Adult ADHD and Suicide Prevention

Adult ADHD and Suicide Prevention

August 31, 2021

The death of someone you love is often met with sadness. But the heartache felt by family members and friends can become more confusing and unnerving when the cause of death is suicide. Researchers say adults with ADHD have a high prevalence of attempted suicide. But is there a direct link between ADHD and suicide? What other risk factors are involved? Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman shares insight and understanding of risk factors and other conditions that often coexist with ADHD, increasing suicidal thoughts and attempts. She also discusses warning signals, preventive measures, and the approach to take if faced with someone expressing suicidal ideation.

 

Jill Harkavy-Friedman, PhD, is vice president of research at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She works with over 200 scientific advisors to evaluate progress in the field and chart the next areas of inquiry to yield impactful insights and strategies for suicide prevention. Dr. Harkavy-Friedman has published over 100 articles. She works closely with AFSP’s education, communication, and public policy and advocacy teams to develop programs and messages to ensure they follow best practices in suicide prevention and reflect the latest findings in research. She earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and her master’s degree and doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Florida. In 1984, she joined Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine as an assistant professor. She established the Adolescent Depression and Suicide Program. In 1989, Dr. Harkavy-Friedman moved to Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, first as an assistant professor and later as an associate professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry. As a licensed psychologist, she maintains a clinical practice in Manhattan.

Teens, ADHD, and Suicide

Teens, ADHD, and Suicide

August 27, 2021

Children and teenagers are more exposed than ever due to social media. They share what they are doing in real-time. As a result, experts say kids are growing up with more anxiety and less self-esteem. For parents, knowing what their child or teen is thinking and feeling becomes even more challenging. So, when do the usual ups and downs of a child with ADHD become something to worry over?  What if your teen is thinking about suicide? Do you know the warning signs? In this episode, Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman talks about the warning signs for parents to watch for in their children. Also, she provides strategies for talking to your child and teen about suicide, building a support network, and preventive measures.

 

Jill Harkavy-Friedman, PhD, is vice president of research at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She works with over 200 scientific advisors to evaluate progress in the field and chart the next areas of inquiry to yield impactful insights and strategies for suicide prevention. Dr. Harkavy-Friedman has published over 100 articles. She works closely with AFSP’s education, communication, and public policy and advocacy teams to develop programs and messages to ensure they follow best practices in suicide prevention and reflect the latest findings in research. She earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and her master’s degree and doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Florida. In 1984, she joined Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine as an assistant professor. She established the Adolescent Depression and Suicide Program. In 1989, Dr. Harkavy-Friedman moved to Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, first as an assistant professor and later as an associate professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry. As a licensed psychologist, she maintains a clinical practice in Manhattan.

Is Your Teen with ADHD College-Ready?

Is Your Teen with ADHD College-Ready?

August 3, 2021

Transitioning from high school to college is a sign of independence for many teens. But is your teen with ADHD ready for the responsibilities that come with college life? Do they have the self-advocacy skills needed for college? Judith S. Bass, a certified educational planner, provides insight on ways to help parents determine if their teen is college-ready. She also discusses the life tools students need to survive college and the appropriate time to start teaching self-advocacy skills to your child with ADHD.

 

Judith S. Bass, CEP

Founder, CollegeWebLD, and Certified Educational Planner

Judith S. Bass, CEP, is an internationally recognized expert in the field of college and postsecondary placement for students who learn differently. For the past twenty years, she has provided comprehensive planning services for students with ADHD, ASD, and other learning differences. Bass is a contributing author to Navigating the Transition from High School to College for Students with Disabilities. Her articles have appeared in numerous magazines, including Washington Parent and Attention. She founded CollegeWebLD, (www.collegewebld.com), a one-stop source of information on college disability services at over 400 colleges in the United States. A past chair of the Commission on Credentialing for AICEP (www.aicep.org) and a past board member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association (IECA), she serves as a consultant to several independent high schools in the Washington, DC, area. Bass received her undergraduate degree in education and Spanish from Stony Brook University, earned a graduate-level certificate in college counseling from UCLA, and holds the Certified Educational Planner designation.

 

Strategies to Help Teens and Young Adults with Treatment Compliance

Strategies to Help Teens and Young Adults with Treatment Compliance

July 28, 2021

Many teens and young adults with ADHD struggle about staying compliant with their treatment plans for various reasons. Strategies that work for their lifestyle are the key to treatment compliance. But what is an effective treatment plan for someone with ADHD?  In this episode, Kate Barrett provides strategies for medication compliance, good sleep hygiene, and recognizing the signs when your method is no longer effective. She also gives insight into the effects of self-medicating with caffeine and marijuana to help with ADHD symptoms.

 

Kate Barrett, ACG, ACC

Kate Barrett, ACG, ACC, is a writer and ADHD and executive function coach and the founder of Coaching Cville, providing services internationally from Charlottesville, Virginia. Her background includes extensive volunteer and advocacy roles in the public school system and ADHD expert roles in parent, couple, and student education seminars. She presents individual and group programs locally and internationally and speaks regularly to professionals, community, and industry on executive function and ADHD. Barrett’s focus is to overlay executive function theory with ADHD coaching in order to facilitate systemic scaffolding and support for those diagnosed with ADHD. In addition, she finds teaching and coaching non-ADHD caregivers and partners on the intricacies of ADHD further supports all members of the relationship through the development and practice of empathy and appreciation for neurodiversity within the family structure.

Strategies to Help with ADHD Treatment Compliance

Strategies to Help with ADHD Treatment Compliance

July 26, 2021

Convincing teens or young adults about the importance of sticking with a treatment plan for their ADHD proves challenging for many parents. What is the best way for a parent to support transition-age youth through a period when they reject their diagnosis or treatment completely? What if something in the treatment plan is not working? What can a parent do if they notice symptoms are becoming a problem, but the teen or young adult either is not seeing it—or does not want to discuss the matter? ADHD coach Kate Barrett shares treatment compliance strategies and tips to help parents support teens or young adults through a successful transition toward adulthood.

 

Kate Barrett, ACG, ACC

Kate Barrett, ACG, ACC, is a writer and ADHD and EF coach and founder of Coaching Cville, providing services internationally from Charlottesville, Virginia. Her background includes extensive volunteer and advocacy roles in the public school system and ADHD expert roles in parent, couple, and student education seminars. She provides individual and group programs locally and internationally and speaks regularly to professionals, community, and industry on executive function and ADHD. Barrett’s focus is to overlay executive function theory with ADHD coaching in order to facilitate systemic scaffolding and support for those diagnosed with ADHD. In addition, she finds teaching and coaching non-ADHD caregivers and partners on the intricacies of ADHD further supports all members of the relationship through the development and practice of empathy and appreciation for neurodiversity within the family structure.

Ongoing Support from Your Child’s Doctor

Ongoing Support from Your Child’s Doctor

July 16, 2021

ADHD professionals recommend combining treatment approaches to address children’s ADHD symptoms. These can include social skills training, behavioral treatment, parent education and support, medication management, and coaching for older teens. But, as a parent, how do you choose the best treatment options for your child? What questions should you ask? And where do you begin to look for the answers you need?

In this episode, clinical psychologist Roberto Olivardia and a parent will model the conversations you would like to have with your child’s ADHD professional or treatment provider. This discussion offers an example of the questions to ask your child’s provider. In addition, it provides a road map that may make your family’s ADHD journey a little easier.

Roberto Olivardia, PhD

Dr. Olivardia is a lecturer in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He maintains a private psychotherapy practice in Lexington, Massachusetts, where he specializes in the treatment of ADHD, executive functioning issues, and students with learning differences. He also focuses on the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and eating disorders in boys and men. He currently serves on the professional advisory boards for CHADD, ADDA, and the National Association for Males with Eating Disorders.

Supporting My Child with ADHD at School

Supporting My Child with ADHD at School

July 14, 2021

It’s school time again, and as a parent, you want to make sure your child with ADHD has all the necessary tools to succeed in the classroom. Therefore, it’s crucial that you establish good communication with your child’s teacher at the beginning of the school year to ensure a smooth and successful term. If your child requires accommodations, how do you know if they are being provided or working? What is the best way to stay in contact with teachers? What if your child’s teacher isn’t familiar with ADHD—what should you do? This role-playing episode features Laci Culbreth, Head of School at Chatham Academy, and Jami Demuth, CHADD’s Midwest Regional Manager. You will learn the importance of establishing good communication with your child’s teachers, getting school support for your child’s learning challenges, asking for accommodations, creating a support network, and much more.

 

Laci Culbreth
Head of School at Chatham Academy

Due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, many schools have transitioned to remote learning or hybrid learning. For learners with ADHD, there are many changes that can make it difficult to succeed at home. Parents and teachers are discovering new ways to help students learn to the best of their abilities. Laci Culbreth discusses the difficulties of ADHD symptoms while learning from home and talks about her experience as a teacher. She provides suggestions for parents on how to help their children with ADHD at home. She also discusses strategies teachers can use to increase support for students with ADHD through remote learning.

“Does My Child Have ADHD?” How to Talk with Your Child’s Doctor

“Does My Child Have ADHD?” How to Talk with Your Child’s Doctor

July 13, 2021

Trying to find a suitable doctor for your child with ADHD can be challenging. The key to a successful search is knowing as much as possible about ADHD, your child’s struggles, and the right questions to ask the potential provider. In fact, knowing the right questions to ask can make a big difference in the way you manage your child’s ADHD. In this role-playing episode featuring Dr. Maggie Sibley and Jami Demuth, you’ll hear how one parent interviewed a psychologist before she made her selection and scheduled her child’s first appointment.

 

Margaret H. Sibley, PhD: 
Dr. Margaret Sibley is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children's Research Institute. Dr. Sibley’s work focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adolescents and young adults. She has authored or co-authored over 80 scientific papers on ADHD and published a book with Guilford Press on treating executive functioning and motivation deficits in teens. She is a member of the CHADD professional advisory board.  

Healthy Peer Relationships

Healthy Peer Relationships

June 10, 2021

Many teens and young adults with ADHD have social skills challenges that make it difficult for them to develop healthy friendships. Their eagerness to fit in can lead them to participate in dangerous and unhealthy activities. Caroline Maguire walks us through the components of healthy peer relationships and signs of unhealthy relationships. She also answers questions from teens and young adults on how to cultivate meaningful, healthy relationships.

 

Caroline Maguire, MEd, ACCG, PCC

Caroline Maguire, MEd, ACCG, PCC, is a personal coach who works with children who struggle socially and the families who support them. She earned her master’s degree in education and early childhood development, with a specialization in social emotional learning, from Lesley University. She is the author of the award-winning book, Why Will No One Play with Me? and founder of the SEL training methodology designed to teach emotional regulation, social and self-awareness, and responsible decision-making skills. She founded the only coach training program accredited by the ICF, ADDA’s The Fundamentals of ADHD Coaching for Families. Visit her website, CarolineMaguireAuthor.com, follow her @AuthorCarolineM and download her free video, How to Tell a Tighter Story. She is a contributing editor to CHADD’s Attention magazine.

ADHD, Self-Harm, and Suicide

ADHD, Self-Harm, and Suicide

June 10, 2021

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2019, suicide was the second leading cause of death among adolescents ages 13 to 19 — and the leading cause of death among 13-year-olds. The suicide death rate among Black youth is increasing faster than any other racial/ethnic group. In addition, 18.4% of youth with ADHD made at least one attempt by age 18, in stark contrast to only 5.7% of youth without ADHD. What are some of the predisposing factors of ADHD that increase the risk of suicide? Michael Meinzer provides insight into the difference between suicidal ideation and self-harm, triggers, warning signs, treatment, and appropriate responses to help someone with suicidal thoughts. He also sets the record straight on myths that prevent individuals and family members from reaching out for support.

 

Michael Meinzer, PhD

Michael Meinzer, PhD, is an assistant professor in the department of psychology and the director of the Young Adult and Adolescent ADHD Services Lab at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He also directs UIC’s SUCCEEDS College ADHD Clinic. His research focuses on adverse outcomes (such as depression, early pregnancy, substance use, delinquency) that are particularly prevalent among individuals with ADHD during adolescence and early adulthood. Dr. Meinzer is interested in examining the mechanisms behind ADHD and comorbid psychopathology and subsequently developing tailored programming to address these difficulties. His work has been recognized by various mental health organizations and has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. He received the Young Scientist Award from CHADD in 2016. He serves as the chair (elect) of the ADHD special interest group for the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) and the secretary (designate) of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (Division 53 of the American Psychological Association). Dr. Meinzer is also a consulting editor of Clinical Research Digest, the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, and the Journal of Attention Disorders.

 

 

Life Management Skills

Life Management Skills

June 10, 2021

Life management skills are skills we all need to manage our day-to-day activities. For some teens and young adults with ADHD, those daily tasks can be a challenge. In this series of podcasts on helping teens and young adults become independent, Andrea Tuscano provides tips and strategies for maintaining an ADHD treatment plan, medication management, and talking with a healthcare provider. She also provides a plan of action for seeking accommodations on the job, scheduling study time, minimizing distractions, and getting to places on time.

 

Dr. Andrea Chronis-Tuscano

Dr. Andrea Chronis-Tuscano is the president of the International Society for Research in Child and Adolescent Psychopathology, an associate editor of the Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, and a member of the CHADD Professional Advisory Board. Dr. Chronis-Tuscano currently serves as ADVANCE Professor for the College of Behavioral & Social Sciences (BSOS) at UMD. 

 

Break the Habit of Dependence

Break the Habit of Dependence

June 10, 2021

As a teen or young adult with ADHD, are you looking for ways to be less dependent on your parents? Do you need tips and strategies on how to get accommodations in college, find a doctor to continue your ADHD treatment, and manage life during and after college? In this episode, Ari Tuckman answers questions similar to those asked by callers to CHADD’s helpline. He addresses what youth ages 14-24 need to know about managing ADHD and life on their own. If you’re a teen or young adult with ADHD, this information will help you break the habit of dependence and show your parents that you’re ready to fly the coop.

 

Ari Tuckman, PsyD, CST

Ari Tuckman, PsyD, CST, has given more than 350 presentations and routinely earns excellent reviews for his ability to make complicated information understandable and useful. He is the author of four books: ADHD After Dark: Better Sex Life, Better Relationship; Understand Your Brain, Get More Done; More Attention, Less Deficit; and Integrative Treatment for Adult ADHD. His More Attention, Less Deficit podcast has more than 100 episodes and more than two million downloads. A psychologist in private practice in West Chester, Pennsylvania, he is a former member of CHADD’s board of directors and serves as the CHADD conference committee's co-chair.

 

Is Boarding School Best for my Child with ADHD?

Is Boarding School Best for my Child with ADHD?

May 25, 2021

Some students with ADHD and learning differences need additional academic support to reach their full potential. Some parents choose to send their children to boarding school. Why? How do you know if boarding school is the right choice for your child and family? Meghan McNeill, director of the learning skills program at Christchurch School, shares insights into why some parents make the boarding school choice, discusses how the program is designed to enrich students with learning challenges and dispels myths about boarding schools.

Bio:

Meghan McNeill

Meghan McNeill is a heart-centered and trauma-informed educator with over a decade of experience in various settings ranging from high school, higher education, to experiential learning and international education. She brings a strong sense of curiosity and unique perspective cultivated from a mental health perspective, a deep understanding of the needs of students with ADHD, anxiety, depression, and learning differences, and the benefits of her own mindfulness practice to her work with young people. She currently serves as the director of the learning skills program at Christchurch School, where she supports and advocates for the social-emotional and academic needs of neurologically diverse students.

How to Select the Right School for a Child with ADHD or Learning Differences

How to Select the Right School for a Child with ADHD or Learning Differences

May 11, 2021

Finding the right school for your child with ADHD or learning differences is challenging. What is the first thing a parent should do in their search? What type of school should they consider: private, public, or boarding? Certified Educational Planner Judy Bass provides helpful insights for starting the selection process and choosing the best school for your child. She also discusses what characteristics and qualities to include on your checklist of pros and cons—and why understanding your child’s needs should play an essential role in the search.

 

Judith S. Bass, CEP

Founder, CollegeWebLD, and Certified Educational Planner

Judith S. Bass, CEP, is an internationally recognized expert in the field of college and postsecondary placement for students who learn differently. For the past 20 years, she has provided comprehensive planning services for students with ADHD, ASD, and other learning differences. Bass is a contributing author to Navigating the Transition from High School to College for Students with Disabilities. Her articles have appeared in numerous magazines, including Washington Parent and Attention. She founded CollegeWebLD, (www.collegewebld.com), a one-stop source of information on college disability services at over 400 colleges in the United States. A past chair of the Commission on Credentialing for AICEP (www.aicep.org) and a past board member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association (IECA), she serves as a consultant to several independent high schools in the Washington, DC, area. Bass received her undergraduate degree in education and Spanish from Stony Brook University, earned a graduate-level certificate in college counseling from UCLA, and holds the Certified Educational Planner designation.

 

Emotion Regulation in Children and Adolescents with ADHD

Emotion Regulation in Children and Adolescents with ADHD

April 30, 2021

Does your child with ADHD have difficulties with emotion regulation? How can you help a child when emotion dysregulation affects their social relationships? Psychologist Carey Heller provides insight into emotion regulation and offers practical strategies parents can use to help their children with ADHD.

Carey A. Heller, Psy.D.

Dr. Carey Heller is a licensed psychologist. His assessment specialties include evaluations for ADHD/executive functioning, learning disabilities, and mood/behavioral disorders in children and adolescents. Dr. Heller's therapy specialties include work with children, adolescents, and young adults for ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorder, anxiety, and life transition issues.

Learn more at CHADD.org

 

The Journey from High School to Young Adulthood with ADHD

The Journey from High School to Young Adulthood with ADHD

April 13, 2021

Are you concerned about how your child with ADHD will manage adulthood independently?

Launching successfully is difficult for many young adults with ADHD. Unfortunately, our late bloomers often don’t have the necessary brain maturity and skills required to juggle the demands of transitioning to college or a full-time job at age 18. In this podcast, Dendy and Hughes share their personal experiences and strategies. They also provide information on career opportunities and ways to help your child with ADHD succeed.

 

Chris Dendy and Ruth Hughes

Bio: Chris A. Zeigler Dendy, MS, is a popular author, educator, school psychologist, and mental health professional with over 40 years of experience. She’s also the mother of three children with ADHD.

Bio: Ruth Hughes, PhD, has been a national leader in ADHD for many years. During her tenure as the CEO of CHADD, she helped to launch the widely recognized Parent to Parent training program, which has helped thousands of parents learn to manage ADHD in the family.

 

Sex, Romance, and the Impact of ADHD

Sex, Romance, and the Impact of ADHD

March 16, 2021

Is ADHD affecting your sex life? In this episode, Psychologist and author Ari Tuckman talks about why it’s essential to address the relationship impact of ADHD. He also shares what his research tells us about the happiest couples and recommends specific interventions for improving sex and romance in your relationship.

 

Ari Tuckman, PsyD, CST

Ari Tuckman, PsyD, CST, has given more than 350 presentations and routinely earns excellent reviews for his ability to make complicated information understandable and useful. He is the author of four books: ADHD After Dark: Better Sex Life, Better Relationship; Understand Your Brain, Get More Done; More Attention, Less Deficit; and Integrative Treatment for Adult ADHD. His More Attention, Less Deficit podcast has more than 100 episodes and more than two million downloads. A psychologist in private practice in West Chester, Pennsylvania, he is a former member of CHADD’s board of directors and serves as the CHADD conference committee's co-chair.

 

Black Adults Who Live with ADHD

Black Adults Who Live with ADHD

February 25, 2021

Podcast transcript:

Summary

Black adults with ADHD face barriers when seeking diagnosis and treatment for ADHD. There are cultural concerns that need to be addressed for them to receive proper evaluation and effective treatment. Dr. Napoleon Higgins, a psychiatrist from Houston, Texas, discusses mental health stigma within the Black community, the cultural values that may impact treatment, and ways to address these issues. He provides resources that can help one find culturally competent providers, and strategies Black adults can use to help providers better understand their challenges.

Napoleon Higgins, MD

Dr. Napoleon Higgins is a child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrist in Houston, Texas.  He is the CEO of Bay Pointe Behavioral Health Services and South East Houston Research Group. He is the president of Black Psychiatrists of Greater Houston, past president of the Caucus of Black Psychiatrists of the American Psychiatric Association, and past president of Black Psychiatrists of America. Dr. Higgins co-authored a number of books, including How Amari Learned to Love School Again: A Story about ADHD, Mind Matters: A Resource Guide to Psychiatry for Black Communities, and author of Transition 2 Practice: 21 Things Every Doctor Must Know In Contract Negotiations and the Job Search.  He also specializes in nutrition and health to improve the mental and physical lives of patients. He has worked with countless community mentoring programs and has a special interest in trauma, racism, and inner-city issues and how they affect minority and disadvantaged children and communities.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain an understanding of mental health stigma in the Black community.
  2. Learn about disclosing an ADHD diagnosis to family members or employers.
  3. Learn about the role spirituality can play in ADHD treatment.
  4. Gain strategies for obtaining a culturally sensitive ADHD treatment provider.
  5. Learn the questions to ask providers for receiving a proper diagnosis.
  6. Learn what newly diagnosed adults with ADHD need to do.

 

The Risks of Misusing Stimulant Medication and Alcohol

The Risks of Misusing Stimulant Medication and Alcohol

February 19, 2021

Podcast Transcript

Summary

Some parents worry about their children sharing their prescribed stimulant medication or using other substances. Sometimes a prescribed medication is diverted to others for non-medical use with devastating results. Julie Buckner, the founder of Josh E. Levine Foundation, shares her story about her young adult son, who passed away as a result of using a mix of stimulants and alcohol. She provides information on how stimulants can be misused by teenagers and young adults, and how medication diversion can be prevented. In this emotional conversation, she also offers recommendations for parents on how to support their young adults.

 

Objectives

  1. Learn how mixing stimulants with alcohol can have fatal results.
  2. Learn about the environments that lead to diversion and substance use.
  3. Learn how youth who are prescribed stimulants can prevent medication theft or diversion.
  4. Learn effective communication strategies regarding substance use that parents can use with their children.

 

Part 1: Challenges in ADHD Care for Children of Color

Part 1: Challenges in ADHD Care for Children of Color

January 29, 2021

Podcast transcript

Summary:  

African Americans face many barriers in getting a proper ADHD evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment. Practitioners need to be mindful of the historical mistreatment of African Americans by the medical community in order to better serve these patients. Dr. Roberto Olivardia, a clinical psychologist and a lecturer in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, describes specific barriers that African Americans face and how they are often misdiagnosed with behavioral problems or overdiagnosed without proper assessment. Dr. Olivardia talks about empowering African-American parents and families so they can advocate for their children, especially when facing a culturally insensitive school system or medical clinician. Additionally, he exhorts practitioners to understand the cultural context of where people of color are coming from and to help increase awareness of ADHD in the African-American community.

 

Roberto Olivardia, PhD

Dr. Roberto Olivardia is a clinical psychologist and lecturer in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He maintains a private psychotherapy practice in Lexington, Massachusetts, where he specializes in the treatment of ADHD, executive functioning issues, and students with learning differences. He also specializes in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and eating disorders in boys and men. He currently serves on the professional advisory boards for CHADD, ADDA, and the National Association for Males with Eating Disorders.

 

Learning Objectives:  

  1. Learn the barriers to evaluation and treatment that exist in healthcare and the school system for African-American children.
  2. Understand the challenges for individuals who are not accurately diagnosed or treated.
  3. Learn the factors that can increase disparities in diagnosis and treatment of ADHD.
  4. Understand how African-American parents can advocate for their children with ADHD when dealing with a culturally insensitive school or medical clinician.
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