Children and Adults with ADHD (CHADD)
Strategies to Help Teens and Young Adults with Treatment Compliance

Strategies to Help Teens and Young Adults with Treatment Compliance

July 28, 2021

Many teens and young adults with ADHD struggle about staying compliant with their treatment plans for various reasons. Strategies that work for their lifestyle are the key to treatment compliance. But what is an effective treatment plan for someone with ADHD?  In this episode, Kate Barrett provides strategies for medication compliance, good sleep hygiene, and recognizing the signs when your method is no longer effective. She also gives insight into the effects of self-medicating with caffeine and marijuana to help with ADHD symptoms.

 

Kate Barrett, ACG, ACC

Kate Barrett, ACG, ACC, is a writer and ADHD and executive function coach and the founder of Coaching Cville, providing services internationally from Charlottesville, Virginia. Her background includes extensive volunteer and advocacy roles in the public school system and ADHD expert roles in parent, couple, and student education seminars. She presents individual and group programs locally and internationally and speaks regularly to professionals, community, and industry on executive function and ADHD. Barrett’s focus is to overlay executive function theory with ADHD coaching in order to facilitate systemic scaffolding and support for those diagnosed with ADHD. In addition, she finds teaching and coaching non-ADHD caregivers and partners on the intricacies of ADHD further supports all members of the relationship through the development and practice of empathy and appreciation for neurodiversity within the family structure.

Strategies to Help with ADHD Treatment Compliance

Strategies to Help with ADHD Treatment Compliance

July 26, 2021

Convincing teens or young adults about the importance of sticking with a treatment plan for their ADHD proves challenging for many parents. What is the best way for a parent to support transition-age youth through a period when they reject their diagnosis or treatment completely? What if something in the treatment plan is not working? What can a parent do if they notice symptoms are becoming a problem, but the teen or young adult either is not seeing it—or does not want to discuss the matter? ADHD coach Kate Barrett shares treatment compliance strategies and tips to help parents support teens or young adults through a successful transition toward adulthood.

 

Kate Barrett, ACG, ACC

Kate Barrett, ACG, ACC, is a writer and ADHD and EF coach and founder of Coaching Cville, providing services internationally from Charlottesville, Virginia. Her background includes extensive volunteer and advocacy roles in the public school system and ADHD expert roles in parent, couple, and student education seminars. She provides individual and group programs locally and internationally and speaks regularly to professionals, community, and industry on executive function and ADHD. Barrett’s focus is to overlay executive function theory with ADHD coaching in order to facilitate systemic scaffolding and support for those diagnosed with ADHD. In addition, she finds teaching and coaching non-ADHD caregivers and partners on the intricacies of ADHD further supports all members of the relationship through the development and practice of empathy and appreciation for neurodiversity within the family structure.

Ongoing Support from Your Child’s Doctor

Ongoing Support from Your Child’s Doctor

July 16, 2021

ADHD professionals recommend combining treatment approaches to address children’s ADHD symptoms. These can include social skills training, behavioral treatment, parent education and support, medication management, and coaching for older teens. But, as a parent, how do you choose the best treatment options for your child? What questions should you ask? And where do you begin to look for the answers you need?

In this episode, clinical psychologist Roberto Olivardia and a parent will model the conversations you would like to have with your child’s ADHD professional or treatment provider. This discussion offers an example of the questions to ask your child’s provider. In addition, it provides a road map that may make your family’s ADHD journey a little easier.

Roberto Olivardia, PhD

Dr. Olivardia is a lecturer in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He maintains a private psychotherapy practice in Lexington, Massachusetts, where he specializes in the treatment of ADHD, executive functioning issues, and students with learning differences. He also focuses on the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and eating disorders in boys and men. He currently serves on the professional advisory boards for CHADD, ADDA, and the National Association for Males with Eating Disorders.

Supporting My Child with ADHD at School

Supporting My Child with ADHD at School

July 14, 2021

It’s school time again, and as a parent, you want to make sure your child with ADHD has all the necessary tools to succeed in the classroom. Therefore, it’s crucial that you establish good communication with your child’s teacher at the beginning of the school year to ensure a smooth and successful term. If your child requires accommodations, how do you know if they are being provided or working? What is the best way to stay in contact with teachers? What if your child’s teacher isn’t familiar with ADHD—what should you do? This role-playing episode features Laci Culbreth, Head of School at Chatham Academy, and Jami Demuth, CHADD’s Midwest Regional Manager. You will learn the importance of establishing good communication with your child’s teachers, getting school support for your child’s learning challenges, asking for accommodations, creating a support network, and much more.

 

Laci Culbreth
Head of School at Chatham Academy

Due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, many schools have transitioned to remote learning or hybrid learning. For learners with ADHD, there are many changes that can make it difficult to succeed at home. Parents and teachers are discovering new ways to help students learn to the best of their abilities. Laci Culbreth discusses the difficulties of ADHD symptoms while learning from home and talks about her experience as a teacher. She provides suggestions for parents on how to help their children with ADHD at home. She also discusses strategies teachers can use to increase support for students with ADHD through remote learning.

“Does My Child Have ADHD?” How to Talk with Your Child’s Doctor

“Does My Child Have ADHD?” How to Talk with Your Child’s Doctor

July 13, 2021

Trying to find a suitable doctor for your child with ADHD can be challenging. The key to a successful search is knowing as much as possible about ADHD, your child’s struggles, and the right questions to ask the potential provider. In fact, knowing the right questions to ask can make a big difference in the way you manage your child’s ADHD. In this role-playing episode featuring Dr. Maggie Sibley and Jami Demuth, you’ll hear how one parent interviewed a psychologist before she made her selection and scheduled her child’s first appointment.

 

Margaret H. Sibley, PhD: 
Dr. Margaret Sibley is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children's Research Institute. Dr. Sibley’s work focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adolescents and young adults. She has authored or co-authored over 80 scientific papers on ADHD and published a book with Guilford Press on treating executive functioning and motivation deficits in teens. She is a member of the CHADD professional advisory board.  

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