Children and Adults with ADHD (CHADD)
How ADHD impairs major life activities and what you can do about it

How ADHD impairs major life activities and what you can do about it

February 16, 2017

The symptoms of ADHD affected more than school performance. They reach into every aspect of life and can impair major life activities at work, school, socially and financially. Dr. Russell A. Barkley, researcher and author of "Taking Charge of Adult ADHD," will discuss how ADHD impairs major life activities and answer questions about ADHD during this special Ask the Expert Webinar presentation. Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D., is Research Professor of Psychiatry at the State University of New York Upstate Medical School in Syracuse, NY and Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina. He is a Diplomate in three specialties, Clinical Psychology (ABPP), Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, and Clinical Neuropsychology (ABCN, ABPP). Dr. Barkley is a clinical scientist, educator, and practitioner who has authored, co-authored, or co-edited 20 books and clinical manuals and published more than 200 scientific articles and book chapters related to the nature, assessment, and treatment of ADHD and related disorders. He is the Editor of the bimonthly clinical newsletter, The ADHD Report. He has presented more than 600 invited addresses internationally and appeared on the nationally televised 60 Minutes, the Today Show, Good Morning America, CBS Sunday Morning, CNN, and many other programs on behalf of those with ADHD. In 1996, he was awarded the C. Anderson Aldrich Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics for his research career in child development. He has received several awards from the American Psychological Association for his contributions to research in ADHD, to clinical practice, and for the dissemination of science. In 1998, he received the Award for Distinguished Contribution to Research from the Section on Clinical Child Psychology, (now Division 53) of the American Psychological Association. In 2002, he received the Dissemination Award from the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology, Division 12, of the American Psychological Association for his career long efforts to dispel misconceptions about ADHD and to educate the public and other professionals about the science of this disorder. And in 2004, he received an award for distinguished service to the profession of psychology from the American Board of Professional Psychology. In 2012, Dr. Barkley was given the Distinguished Career Award from the Division of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology of the American Psychological Association.

Is My High School Student Ready for College? (And Is My College Student Ready to Go Back?)

Is My High School Student Ready for College? (And Is My College Student Ready to Go Back?)

February 9, 2017

For many high school students, it's expected that they will graduate and go to college. But many parents worry whether they are ready for that level of independent living. College campuses can be among the most distracting and tempting places for young adults. This is especially true for students with ADHD who may not have the executive functioning skills to manage the lack of oversight and structure.

In this webinar learn how high students can show their parents that they are ready for college. We will explore different situations such as handling their own medication. We will also discuss options for students who are not yet ready and how they can use the extra time at home to help prepare them. Both parents of students preparing for college and parents of college students on a break will leave with strategies to move forward.

Viewers will be able to: · Identify the skills necessary for student success on a college campus. · Assess their high school student's or young adult's readiness to go to or return to college. · List options if the high school student or young adult is not ready for college right now.

Student Supports and ADHD Management Strategies

Student Supports and ADHD Management Strategies

February 2, 2017

Did you know that students with ADHD are, on average, about 30 percent delayed in their ability to organize and follow directions compared with their classmates? These students struggle to maintain attention and are drawn towards stimulating activities. Sandra Rief, MA, author of How to Reach & Teach Children with ADD/ADHD, will discuss techniques teachers and educators can use in their classrooms to help children affected by ADHD be successful students. Ms. Rief will have tips on classroom management, keeping students on task and student self-regulations strategies.

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